Teaching

Teaching is a passion and a work. The passion is both for the subject you teach and for the mission of making an impact on the growth and mindset of students. My attitude is to be active in attracting the student attention, while keeping accessible, helpful, and available for questions and discussion. As Einstein taught us “Everything should be made as simple as possible, but no simpler.” Teaching is also a work, which requires rigorous methods and good organization. A key point is to have an efficient organization of the teaching for the entire semester before starting of lectures. I try to fix specifically educational objectives, encompass wide variety of exercises and homework, organize exams and lecture topics accordingly. Being available for students is a must to establish a positive relationship.

Courses Taught at Rutgers

50–640–466 MATH METHODS IN SYSTEM BIOLOGY I

The course provides an introduction to mathematical methods for systems biology. In particular linear algebra, probability, theories of networks (graph theory), difference and ordinary differential equations will be developed as tools to address a wide set of biological and biomedical applications. The latter will range from classical prey-predator populations examples to biological networks.

50–640–466 MATH METHODS IN SYSTEM BIOLOGY II

The course MMBSII focuses on advanced mathematical methods, which are of particular relevance for biological systems. Building up on MMBS I, the course will further develop the theory of ordinary differential equations, dealing with equilibrium analysis, phase portraits, Lyapunov stability and control theory. Then links between properties of networks and systems of ODEs will be explored. Some advanced topics, such as random graphs and/or social dynamics are also treated.